Online Guide

This page guides you through the types of scholarly sources, search skills and strategies you must know to conduct research activities. In addition, it also includes how to add quotations and references in your papers as well as guidance on various library services.

 

Everything here is covered by off-line library classes. In library classes, you can gain more effective skills and useful knowledge. 🙂

 

 

 

  • Contents
    • Basics for information search: Search process, types of information, usage by resource type(books, articles, theses, references)
    • Search technique: Search engines(library website, google scholar, academic databases), boolean operators
    • Writing papers: Quotations & references
    • Library services A-Z

 

 

Basics for information search

  • Information Search Process
  • Types of Information Sources
    • If you want to know the latest research trends or results?
    • If you want to get background information of a particular topic?
  • How to Search and Use by Information Source Type
    • Books
    • Journals&articles
    • Theses & dissertations
    • References(dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks)

Information search process

1. Acquiring Background Information

If you start to search for materials in unfamiliar topics, it’s important to acquire background information before you search. When searching with keywords that come to mind vaguely, it’s hard to figure out what information you need. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the basic concepts and definitions of the topic through books or reference materials before searching.

 

2. Extracting Search Keywords

It can also be difficult to choose appropriate search keywords of unfamiliar topics. If you have acquired background information through books or reference materials, you can extract keywords(e.g. academic terms) from the resources. In addition, you can also catch useful keywords from abstract & index databases.

  • Extracting keywords using scholarly databases(Web of Science, Scopus)
    • Citation databases? Link
    • Scholarly databases provide provide bibliographic information and keywords for millions of literature. You can also use this keyword to search for information.

 

3. Selecting Search Keywords

The search results may vary depending on which search keywords are used. Therefore, the most important thing in the information search process is the selection of search keywords.

When you select search keywords, you need to check the synonyms of the words. You also need to identify hypernyms and hyponyms of the words. For example, when searching for information on ‘college student’s leisure life’, you can narrow down search results by using hyponyms of “college student” such as ‘exchange student’, ‘foreign student,’ and ‘enrolled student.’

 

4. Determining Search Scope

If you start searching with keywords that are too specific from the beginning, the number of search results may be too small. If you’re unfamiliar with the topic of the material you’re looking for, we recommend that you narrow down your search step by step.

 

5. Analyzing search results

You can extract other search keywords from the articles you searched for. A new search may be made by referring to the literature referenced by the articles or the literature cited by them.

 

▶ Useful document: 연구 및 레포트 작성을 위한 6단계 레시피(Source: EBSCOhost)

Types of information sources

  • If you want to know the latest research trends or results?
  • If you want to get background information of a particular topic?

 

The ‘Academic materials’ refer to books, journals, databases, etc. provided by libraries. If you know what academic materials you need and how to use them, you can conduct research more efficiently.

 

▶ Related document(PDF)
A+ 받는 지름길(1) 교육자료(배포용)

If you want to get background information of a particular topic?

1. Book

  • Books provide systematic and comprehensive information and many references to a particular subject. However, they take a long time to be published, so they are not suitable type of academic materials for getting the latest information.
  • Books are useful material when you want to know the basic concepts or definitions of a research subject.

▶ How to search and use books: Library website > Keywords search (Printed books: Use after checking the location of the bookshelf and availability of loans, e-Books: Click on text link URL)

 

 

2. Review article

  • A review article is an article that summarizes the current state of understanding on a topic. A review article surveys and summarizes previously published studies, rather than reporting new facts or analysis.
  • A review is a useful source when you want to know which of the many articles is qualitatively superior or what trends are in the field.
  • There are some review articles that indicate importance in a reference list or that contain useful notes, so you can refer to them when you’re thinking about which article to read.

 

3. Dictionary

  • A dictionary is a listing of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically, which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, and translation.
  • Dictionaries are divided into general language dictionaries, specialized dictionaries, and subject dictionaries according to the purpose of use. The subject dictionary is a dictionary that selects terms and items in a particular topic field and is made for researchers and those who are interested in the field.

 

4. Encyclopedia

  • An encyclopedia is a reference work or compendium providing summaries of knowledge either from all branches or from a particular field or discipline.
  • Encyclopedias are divided into articles or entries that are often arranged alphabetically by article name and sometimes by thematic categories.

 


  • Can I use Wikipedia content in my report? Try the Encyclopedia Britannica instead!

Although Wikipedia is a famous online encyclopedia, it is difficult to fully trust the accuracy and quality of content that anyone can freely write and correct. So why don’t you use an academic encyclopedia as a reference for your research?

Explore the fact-checked online encyclopedia from Encyclopedia Britannica with hundreds of thousands of objective articles, biographies, videos, and images.


 

5. Handbook

  • A handbook is a type of reference work, or other collection of instructions, that is intended to provide ready reference. The term originally applied to a small or portable book containing information useful for its owner.
  • Handbooks may deal with any topic, and are generally compendiums of information in a particular field or about a particular technique. They are designed to be easily consulted and provide quick answers in a certain area.

If you want to know the latest research trends or results?

1. Journal

  • An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which includes the latest research results as well as review of research trends in specific research fields;.
  • Most research papers in journals are submitted by researchers and peer-reviewed or refereed by experts in each area. Therefore, the content of journals are reliable sources to understand the latest findings of each research fields;
  • Leading journals of science and technology: Nature, Cell, Science

▶ Online resources(Journals&Databases) provided by UNIST Library: Library Website > E-Resources > Databases

 

 

2. Conference proceeding

  • A conference proceeding is the published record of a academic conference, congress, symposium, or other meeting held by a society or association. It usually includes abstracts or papers presented in the conferences.
  • The information provided by the conference proceeding is up to date and useful for you to keep track of the latest research trends.

 

 

3. Patent

  • A patent is a form of intellectual property that gives its owner the legal right to exclude others from making, using, or selling an invention for a limited period of years in exchange for publishing an enabling public disclosure of the invention.
  • Patent requirements
    – The invention must be statutory (subject matter eligible)
    – The invention must be new
    – The invention must be useful
    – The invention must be non-obvious

▶ Patent Search: WIPS ON (www.wipson.com) / Available after creating a personal account (Use UNIST mail account within campus)

 

4. Standard

  • A standard is a technical definition of the minimum level or optimal condition of the quality or performance of a product and service.
  • Standards vary in length of content and include illustrations, measurement methods, definitions, ownership, etc. and are published in a certain form.
  • They also have serial numbers given by the issuing authority.

▶ Standard Search: e-나라 표준인증(https://standard.go.kr/)

 

 

5. Thesis or dissertation

  • A thesis or dissertation is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author’s research and findings.
  • Dissertations can be especially useful for locating recent research that may not yet be published in book or article format.

▶ Search and browse the UNIST theses & dissertations: ScholarWorks@UNIST

How to Search and Use by Information Source Type

  • Book
  • Journals & Article
  • Thesis & Dissertation
  • Reference (dictionary, encyclopedia, handbook)

 

Maybe you will search the Library website, not Google, when you want to use the Library’s books. So if you know which sources you need and decide which sources to find, then you should choose where to find them..

 

▶ Related documents (PDF)

A+ 받는 지름길(1) 교육자료(배포용) 책 이용 처음부터 끝까지 교육 PPT 논문 검색 A-Z(배부용) Google Scholar Guide(배부용)

A to Z of Finding Books

Book

If you can’t find the book you need in the Library, you can request following services: Recommend a Purchase / Inter Library Loan / Document Delivery Service

 

1. How to Search

① Access the Library website > Enter search keywords for Search All > Select the appropriate item from the search results

 

② Access the Library website > SEARCH & BROWSE > Books, Media

 

③ Check the search results: e-Books(status: full text available), printed books(status: available at)

 

④ Refine the search results

  • If you want to refine your search results to printed books: Resource Type> Book
  • If you want to refine your search results to e-Books: Resource Type> E-Book

 

2. How to use printed books: SEARCH & BROWSE > Check bookshelf location, call Number, availability of Loans

  • Locations of bookshelves in the library
Loanable Not loanable
[1F]Classics in S&T [1F]Magazine Collections
[1F]Comic Books [3F]Basic Science Books
[1F]Faculty Recommended Books [3F]Reference Books
[1F]New Arrivals [3F]Thesis
[1F]Story Books Career Development Center
[1F]Theme Collections Faculty Office
[1F]Ulsan for you Language Education Center
[3F Desk]Course Reserves
[3F]Course Reserves
[3F]What to Read?

 

  • Call Number

Call numbers are addresses which help us locate materials in the Library.

The UNIST Library categorizes books by subjects applying LC classifications (LCC: Library of Congress Classification).

The LC classifications allows us to further divide topics in the field of science and technology.

  • Loan status: Available at (loanable), Checked out from (not loanable)
  • If a book in need is borrowed or checked-out, you can make a reservation to get first when it is returned.

To reserve a book: Request on the Library catalog >> Receive a notification e-mail or SMS when the book returned or ready. Visit 1F 『Smart Library』 to check-out the book.
If you won’t check-out the requested book within a fixed period of time (e.g. 3 days), the book will be delivered to the next-ranked user who made reservation.
The due date of the book cannot be extended if someone else reserved the book you checked out.

 

3. How to use e-books

  • Korean e-Books: Maximum 3 books for 15 days each available(automatically returned on due date)

The library provides 4 Korean e-book services.

To access e-Book websites: Library website > E-RESOURCES > E-Books

Services – Yes24
– Y2Books
– EPYRUS
– iPAPRIKA

 

– for PC: Access after library website login

– for Mobile: To use mobile application you will need at least one access from your computer to each e-book webpage (ID: student number, PW: date of birth, YY/MM/DD)

 

  • English e-Books: Downloading PDF files per chapter is available in case of many English e-books.

■ eBook (PDF) > To download PDF, click ‘View PDF’ on the webpage of each chapter. (Only purchased titles available)
■ eBook (EBSCO) > Available view online but downloading PDF is limited to only some pages in allowed maximum pages per title.

 

▶ More information: Library Website > E-Resources > E-Books

Journal&Article

1. Basics

  • Journal & Article

Scholarly or peer-reviewed journals have collections of articles written by experts in academic or professional fields. Journals are excellent for finding out what has been studied or researched on a topic, and to find bibliographies that point to other relevant sources of information.

 

  • Components of an article: Bibliographic information
    If you understand the composition of the articles well, you can search them efficiently.
  • Journal title: The title of a journal (e.g. Nature, Science, Cell)
  • Article title: The title of a article (e.g. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome)
  • Volume & Issue: The journal is published on a ‘issue’ basis. One year’s publication is called ‘volume’.
  • Abstract: Abstract is an outline of a article that compresses the text and summarizes it into 200 to 300 words. Even if you don’t read the entire paper, you can decide whether you should read it by reading the abstract.
  • DOI (Digital object identifier): A DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). A DOI aims to be “resolvable,” usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers (e.g. 10.1038/nature11247).

 

  • Reference
    • Reference refers to the compilation of bibliographic information of various materials that the author referred to in writing the articles.
    • The reason for writing reference is to secure academic reliability of research and to prevent plagiarism. The format of writing references varies by research fields and journals.
    • References can usually be found at the end of papers.
    • How to read references (NATURE Style)
      Parker, S. C., Hansen, L., Abaan, H. O., Tullius, T. D. & Margulies, E. H. Local DNA topography correlates with functional noncoding regions of the human genome. Science 324, 389–392 (2009).
  • Journal title: Science
  • Article title: Local DNA topography correlates with functional noncoding regions of the human genome
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Volume: 324
  • Pages: 380-392

 

  • Research article & Review article
    • A research article is a paper containing new research results on a particular subject.
    • A review article is a paper summarizing and commenting on the published literature on a particular subject. A review is a useful source of information when you want to know which of the many articles is qualitatively superior or what trends are in the field.
    • There are some review articles that indicate importance in reference list or that contain useful notes, so you can refer to them when you’re thinking about which article to read.

 

 

2. How to Search & Use

There are 3 main ways to use journals and articles: search on journal sites and databases, search on Google Scholar, and search on library websites. If the Library does not subscribe to the journals and databases you want to use, apply for the following service: ‘Recommend a Purchase/Inter Library Loan/Document Delivery Service

 

  • Library website

① Access the Library website > Enter search keywords for Search All > Select the appropriate item from the search results (Articles, e-Resources)

 

② Refine the search results: Resource Type > Articles

 

③ Browse the article

– a paper contained in Science, volume 330, issue 6005, pages 762-3

– [Peer Reviewed Journal] a paper reviewed by the editors

– Full text available

  • Search Engine: Google Scholar (scholar.google.com)
    • Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. Search across a wide variety of disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books and more.
    • You can search for journal articles and go to web pages where you can download PDF files or view the original full-text.
    • Advantage: Easy to search the original full-text of the paper.
    • Demerits: Too much data found related to the keyword entered.

 

  • Journals Sites & Databases

– Journals: E-RESOURCES > E-Journals

You can browse the Library website for journals serviced by the Library and access the journal sites that provide full text of the articles. Use this page to read the latest or existing articles in a particular journal.

 

– Databases: E-RESOURCES > Databases

A database is a academic online service that allows you to search for the latest research findings in a single platform. Depending on the type of data provided, the database can be divided into full-text DB, citation index DB, and specialized DB. Choose the type of database you prefer and search.

 

▶ For more information about Databases: Library Website > E-Resources > Databases

Full-text databases Use to download the full-text(PDF files) right after searching

e.g. Elsevier ScienceDirect, Wiley, Springer, Nature

Bibliographic database Use to search for bibliographic information such abstracts, references, etc. of articles

e. g. EBSCOhost, ProQuest Central

Citation index databases Use to search for literature based on the citation information between articles.

e.g. Web of Science, Scopus

Specialized databases Use to search for articles related to a specific topic: Chemistry(SciFinder, Reaxys), Standards(ASTM, KS), Patents(WIPS ON), Journal Evaluation(JCR – Journal Impact Factor)

Thesis & Dissertation

A thesis or dissertation is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author’s research and findings. If the library does not provided theses you want to use, apply for the following service: ‘Recommend a Purchase/Inter Library Loan/Document Delivery Service

 

1. UNIST Theses & Dissertations

The ScholarWorks@UNIST is an institutional repository which collects, preserves and disseminates UNIST’s research outputs. It aims to increase the accessibility and visibility of UNIST researchers and their research outputs, and to foster opportunities for collaboration.

  • Library website

① Access the Library website > Enter search keywords for Search All > Select the appropriate item from the search results (Books & Medias)

② Refine the search results: Resource Type > Dissertations

③ How to use: Printed copy (not loanable, only available on the 3rd floor), Online version (depends on author’s permission to make public, there may be items that are not available)

 

2. How to search domestic theses & dissertations

– Integrated search of domestic master’s and doctoral dissertations is available

– Available after personal membership and login (Institution: UNIST, 울산과학기술원)

 

– Integrated search of domestic master’s and doctoral dissertations is available

– Full-text available after personal membership and login (Institution: UNIST, 울산과학기술원)

– Available on the PC for the Digital Library of National Assembly on the 2nd floor (Location: near the elevators)

 

3. How to search foreign theses & dissertations

– Available from 4 p.m. to 9 a.m. the next day via RISS

PDU DDOD

Digital Dissertations on Demand

PQDT

ProQuest Dissertations &Theses

About Academic database serves the full-text of foreign Ph.D. dissertations. [All subjects] Citation index databases serves the bibliography information of foreign master’s and Ph.D. dissertations.
About 1,500 major universities in North America, Europe, and Asia. [All subjects]
Contents 1999-Present
Foreign doctoral dissertations
1637-Present
Foreign master’s and Ph.D. dissertations
Services Abstracts and full-text available
(*Full-text download available)
Abstracts, full-text preview available
(up to 24 pages maximum)

– Search and download available for Ph.D. dissertations from major British universities

About UK’s national thesis service which aims to maximise the visibility and availability of the UK’s doctoral research theses.
Institution British Library
Contents Any dissertations produced by the British Higher Education Institutions.(New items are collected and updated every week)
Services Full-text available(* Individual membership required)

– Free service: Electronic item(e.g. PDF)
– Paid service: Request digitization of physical items(e.g. CD, DVD) or postal request

 

DSpace@MIT is a service of the MIT Libraries to provide MIT faculty, researchers and their supporting communities stable, long-term storage for their digital research and teaching output and to maximize exposure of their content to a world audience. DSpace@MIT content includes conference papers, images, peer-reviewed scholarly articles, preprints, technical reports, theses, working papers, research datasets and more. This collection of more than 90,000 high-quality works is recognized as among the world’s premier scholarly repositories and receives, on average, more than 1 million downloads per month.

Reference (Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Handbook)

Reference materials usually refer to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and handbooks. References are useful at the beginning of the research because they contain background knowledge on the subject. If you want to use reference, Search and browse the Library website. If the library does not provided items you want to use, apply for the following service: ‘Recommend a Purchase/Inter Library Loan/Document Delivery Service

 

1. Types of references

  • Dictionary: A dictionary is a listing of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically, which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, and translation;
  • Encyclopedia: An encyclopedia is a reference work or compendium providing summaries of knowledge either from all branches or from a particular field or discipline;
  • Handbook: A handbook is a type of reference work, or other collection of instructions, that is intended to provide ready reference. The term originally applied to a small or portable book containing information useful for its owner.

 

2. How to use

  • Access the Library website > Enter search keywords for Search All
  • Printed copy: Check bookshelf location, call number, availability of loans
    – Location of items that cannot be loaned: [3F] References Books(only available in the Library)
    – Electronic items: Click on the URL provided

Search Technique

  • Search engine
    • Library website: browsing search results, refining search results
    • Google Scholar: features, setting preferences, browsing search results
    • Databases: citation index DB, Korean academic databases
  • Search operator
    • Boolean operator(AND, OR, NOT), syntax search operator, etc.

Library Website

You can search all kinds of academic materials on the Library website. While search results from search engines such as Google and Naver may include data that have not been evaluated for academic reliability and usefulness, items found on library websites are highly reliable.

 

1. Search

 

All items serviced by the Library can be searched through the search window on the main screen of the Library website.

If you want to search for a specific type of item, use the ‘SEARCH & BROWSE’ and ‘E-RESOURCES’ menus at the top of the screen.

  • SEARCH&BROWSE: books, magazines, newspapers, DVDs, new arrivals, course reserves.
  • E-RESOURCES: journals, databases, e-books, audio books.

 

 

2. Browse the search results

 

If you search in the integrated search box of the Library website, you will find the Library resources containing the keywords you entered.

If you want to refine the type of items you can use the ‘Search for’ tab in the search box or the ‘Resource Type’ tab on the right. In addition, the language and the year of publication can be limited.

 

Materials that can be serviced in physical form such as printed books, magazines, and DVDs are seen as ‘Available at ….’ ‘Available’ means available to use. Depending on the bookshelf location, some materials may be available to read on site but cannot be loaned.

Electronic materials such as e-books, articles are seen as ‘Full text available.’ Click this phrase to access a page where you can view full-text of the search result.

The type of material is displayed above the title of the item as ‘BOOK,’ ‘JOURNAL,’ ‘BOOK CHAPTER,’ etc.

 

3. Refine the search results

 

You can easily refine your search results by using various facets on the left side of the search result page.

Search results are basically sorted by relevance and can be sorted by publication date, author, and title as needed.

Sort by Topic
Show only(specific types of item) Classification LCC
Resource Type Creator(Author)
Creation Date(Publication year) Language
Journal Title Location

 

If you want to find books related to ‘Organic Chemistry,’ for instance you can refine your search results by: ① Resource Type > Book, ② Show only > Available in the Library. If you use the second facet to refine your search results, ‘printed books on loan’ will be excluded from the search results and only the currently available items will be shown in the search results.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a search engine that allows you to search the various scholarly web pages existing on the Web in an integrated way.

Google Scholar allows users to search for academic papers, academic papers, books, green, and patents, and is a highly preferred search tool because it is easy to obtain full-texts.

 


★ Are all items searched on Google Scholar free of charge? ★

Full-texts of the literature you searched for in Google Scholar is available because the Library subscribes to the material and serves it. 😉


 

1. Google Scholar basics

  • My Library

To save an article in ‘My Library,’ click the star icon below the search result. (login needed);

  • Alerts

A service that notifies you when a new item is indexed in Google Scholar when you set a keyword or search term that you are interested in;

  • Settings

Set library links (library registration serving the full-text), languages, search results.

 

2. Settings

Setting should be done while the browser is not in secret mode. If you set it up in secret mode and close the browser window, the changes will be reset.

 

  • Language setting: Settings > Languages;

Check your language if you want to search only for materials in a specific language;

  • Library link: Settings > Library links > search ‘UNIST’ > Find it @ UNIST > Save

Full-text can be accessed through the Library website in conjunction with the Link Resolve service.

 

3. Search (basic, advanced)

 

  • Basic search: Searching for data using the main search bar

The basic search conditions for Google Scholar are as follows: if the search keyword you entered is contained anywhere in the text, it will be included in the search results. When searching in multiple keywords, importance is evaluated according to the order entered.

 

  • Advanced search

 

  • Search using operators
Operators Roles Tips
AND Search for X and Y. This will return only results related to both X and Y.

Example: 3D AND printing

  • It doesn’t really make much difference for regular searches, as Google defaults to “AND” anyway. But it’s very useful when paired with other operators.
“ ” Force an exact-match search.

Example: “theory of relativity”

  • Use this to refine results for ambiguous searches, or to exclude synonyms when searching for single words.
OR Search for X or Y. This will return results related to X or Y, or both.

Examples: VR OR virtual reality

  • The pipe (|) operator can also be used in place of “OR.”
Exclude a term or phrase

Example: jobs ‑apple

  • In our example, any pages returned will be related to jobs but not Apple (the company).
Intext: Find pages containing a certain word (or words) somewhere in the content.

Example: intext:apple

  • For this example, any results containing the word “apple” in the page content will be returned.
intitle: Find pages with a certain word (or words) in the title.

Example: Intitle:mars

  • In our example, any results containing the word “mars” in the title tag will be returned.
author: Used to find items created by a specific author.
For more detailed author searches, it is recommended to search with initials rather than full names. Example author:flowers
author:“d knuth”
author:“de knuth”
author:“donald e knuth”
  • Spacing between a colon(:) and a search keyword fails to function as a search operator.
  • If you want to search by the Korean author’s English name, we recommend you check the author’s initials and English names first.
  • It is not recommended to use the search operator ” ” together because only exactly the same item with the author’s name is searched.
source: Find results from a certain source such as academic journals.

Example:

source:nature

source:science

  • Spacing between a colon(:) and a search keyword fails to function as a search operator.

 

4. Browse the search results

 

 

Google Scholar’s search results are sorted by default in a relevant order. Also, the publisher, author, and cited times are reflected in the priority of search results.

 

  • ” (Cite): To generate bibliography automatically based on the various reference styles such as MLA, Chicago.
  • Cited by: To check for other items that have been cited the item.
  • Related articles: To check for other items similar to those searched.
  • Web of Science: To check for the number of items in ‘Web of Science’ that have been cited the item.

 

5. How to use a article not subscribed to the Library

  • Find it @ UNIST: Find it @ UNIST service makes it easy to input a items’s information when applying for Document Delivery Service. Example:

① Settings – Library link – ‘Find it @ UNIST’ setting

② Clink on ‘Find it @ UNIST’

③ Click on ‘Making Requests’

④ Click on ‘Request’ after checking the bibliography of the article

 

  • DDS: Document Delivery Service: Delivers copies of journal article, book chapter scans, academic dissertations from other institutions that are not available in our library.
Available materials Journal articles, dissertations, reports, book chapters, etc.
Fees Free (not available for more than $100 per item)
Period 2-7 Business days
How to receive After receiving the notification please take your requested items at the library.
Notices Will be discarded if the item is not received within 7 days.

Restriction on the use of DDS if you don’t get it at least 3 times or more per year.

Databases

Databases are collections of scholarly materials which are very useful tools for researchers to search and find relevant resources for their literature study. It contains bibliographical information or full text of journal articles, conference proceedings, magazines, and reports in specific subjects.

 


  • Would you like to browse the databases provided by the library? Library Website > E-RESOURCES > Databases
  • Would you like to use the databases outside of campus or at home? Library Website > E-RESOURCES> Off-Campus Access

 

1. Citation index database: SCOPUS, Web of Science

 

  • Citation index database? Quick Link
  • Tips for use

① When you want to know which of the many articles is qualitatively superior or what trends are in the field.

Scopus and Web of Science provide searches of articles in core journals published around the world. If you don’t know much about research topics or don’t know which articles to read, try Scopus or Web of Science. You can search and browse for a useful information on a topic or subject keyword.

② When you want to sort or limit your search results in order of cited times.

Google Scholar allows you to sort search results by date and relevance only, but citation index DB can sort search results using a variety of facets. You can sort the search results based on the number of cited times to find out which papers are cited a lot.

③ When you want to refine your search results to more detail.

You can browse without search results of type or condition that you do not need by refining the topic, publication date, and the type of items.

 

  • Scopus (scopus.com)
    • The largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.
    • Delivering a comprehensive overview of the world’s research output in the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities.
    • Journal impact factor: SJR, SNIP
    • Contents: journals, conference proceedings, book series, etc.
    • Full-text download available
  • Web of Science (www.webofknowledge.com)
    • Abstracts and citation database which includes more than 14,000 titles of major journals in all subjects.
    • Research achievements of researchers and institutions can be analyzed.
    • Journal impact factor: JCR [ ※ Journal Impact Factor?]
    • Contents: Journals
    • Full-text download available

 

2. Domestic academic databases

  • RISS (riss.kr)
    • Journal papers published by Korean societies, theses & dissertations of Korean universities, books in Korean university libraries are available.
    • Available after personal membership and login (Institution: UNIST, 울산과학기술원)
  • DBPia (dbpia.co.kr), KISS (kiss.kstudy.com)
    • Journals and conference proceedings published by Korean societies and institutions are avaialble.
    • Bibliography information and full-text download is available.
  • NDSL (ndsl.kr)
    • Journal papers, conference proceedings, patents, reports, and standards in science and technology fields are available.
    • Bibliography information and full-text download is available.

 

3. Statistics databases

  • KOSIS(National statistics portal) (kosis.kr)
    • Statistical data of international and North Korea is available. Raw data is provided.
  • KSDC (ksdcdb.kr)
    • Survey and statistical data produced by the government, public institutions, research institutes are available.
  • ICPSR (icpsr.umich.edu)
    • Statistics and poll data produced in countries around the world are available. Raw data is provided.

Search operators

Roles Operators Example Applicable sites
When searching for items that contain all of the search keywords. AND 3D AND printing Google
Google Scholar
Web of Science
Scopus
Library website
When searching for items that contain any of the search keywords. OR VR OR virtual reality Google
Google Scholar
Web of Science
Scopus
Library website
When searching excluding a specific term. NOT lung NOT cancer Web of Science
Library website
AND NOT lung AND NOT cancer Scopus
flowers -lily Google
Google Scholar
When searching for items that exactly matches the phrase you want. “ ” “theory of relativity” Google
Naver
Google Scholar
Library website
Web of Science
Scopus
Proximity Operators When searching for items that exist within a certain number of words of each other. NEAR/n network NEAR/3 robot Web of Science
In Address searches, use SAME to restrict your search to terms that appear in the same address within a Full Record. SAME UNIST SAME Ulsan Web of Science
It doesn’t matter which word comes before the other. W/n sensor W/15 robot Scopus
The first word must be no more that (n) words apart from the second word. PRE/n sensor PRE/3robot

 

Scopus
Find pages containing a certain word (or words) somewhere in the content. Intext: Intext:library

※ There should be no space between the search operator and the search term.

Google
Google Scholar
Find pages with a certain word (or words) in the title. intitle: Intitle:mars
※ There should be no space between the search operator and the search term.
Google
Google Scholar
Author search author: author:flowers
author:“d knuth”
author:“de knuth”
author:“donald e knuth”
Google Scholar
Journal title search source: source:nature
source:science
※ There should be no space between the search operator and the search term.
Google Scholar
Restrict results to those of a certain filetype.
E.g., PDF, DOCX, TXT, PPT, etc.
filetype: research reports filetype:pdf Google
Include synonyms. ~ ~nature Google
Search for a range of numbers. .. 2010..2020 Google

Writing In-Text Citation & Reference List

  • The Importance of acknowledging sources
  • When and how to acknowledge sources
  • How to cite in text
  • How to write a reference list
  • How to make a reference list easy

The importance of acknowledging sources

1. Why is it important to acknowledge someone else’s work?

  • It helps you to avoid plagiarism.

If you use other people’s ideas or papers for your work, you must indicate the source. Plagiarism is presenting someone else’s work or ideas as your own, with or without their consent, by incorporating it into your work without full acknowledgement.

 

  • It helps to support your argument.

Academic writing cannot be persuasive by your argument alone. You must base your research on various prior studies and clearly indicate the source of the data so that you can secure the credibility of your research.

 

  • It helps others search and browse the items you cited.

A reference list allows people who are conducting new research based on your paper or doing similar research to find out what items you have cited.

 

2. Type of plagiarism

The ethics required for research activities are usually referred to as research ethics. Violations of research ethics include plagiarism, tampering, and forgery. Plagiarism is an act that students are likely to violate while doing their assignments. Plagiarism is presenting someone else’s work or ideas as your own, with or without their consent, by incorporating it into your work without full acknowledgement.

 

  • What are research ethics and why are they important? Link to related contents (대학생을 위한 학습윤리, 대학원생을 위한 연구윤리)
  • Type of plagiarism (Source: 연구윤리정보센터, Korean)
  • Originality checking service ‘turnitin
    Turnitin is an originality checking and plagiarism prevention service that checks your writing for citation mistakes or inappropriate copying.

When and how to acknowledge sources

1. When to acknowledge sources

If you use other people’s works e.g. books, journal articles, newspaper articles, websites, blogs, social medias, charts, graphs, and photos, then you should mark the source.

 

2. What doesn’t need to be cited?: Common knowledge [1]

Common knowledge does not need to be cited. Common knowledge includes facts that are known by most people and can be found in many sources. However, specific statistical data, which can be changed and disputed, must be cited. In addition, if common knowledge includes expert opinions and interpretations, the source should be noted.

 

  • Regional, cultural and historical facts
    • The capital of South Korea is Seoul.
    • Moon Jae-in is the 19th president in South Korea.
    • National liberation day is a day to commemorate Korea’s liberation from Japan in 1945 and the establishment of the Korean government.

 

  • Established theory
    • Water boils at 100°C.
    • The molecular structure of water is H2O.
    • Law of universal gravity: Every particle attracts every other particle in the universe with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between their centers.
  • Wise saying or adage
    • “of the people, by the people, for the people” (Abraham Lincoln)

 

What if you’re confused about whether to write the source or not? Do it! 🙂

[1] “Academic Integrity at MIT: A Handbook for Students,” 17 07 2019. [Online]. Available: https://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/citing-your-sources/what-common-knowledge.

How to Acknowledge Sources

1. Direct Quotation
A direct quotation is a report of the exact words of an author or speaker and is placed inside quotation marks in a written work. Even if the source is indicated, it can still be plagiarism if it is written without quotation marks(“”). For long quotes(more than 5 lines or 100 words), create a new line and separate paragraphs with left, right, and bottom margins without using quotation marks.

 

2. Indirect quotation
Indirect quotation refers to summarizing the original text or changing it into your own words. Paraphrasing and summarizing are indirect quotations. Indirect quotations do not use quotation marks, so you must clearly indicate the quoted content. When paraphrasing other people’s writings, it is recommended to indicate as ‘Someone claimed as follows’ and ‘Some people’s views are as follows’.

 

3. Re-quotation
Re-quoting the contents quoted by others is not recommended in academic writing except in special cases. You can re-quote when you can’t get or interpret the original full-text. In this case, you should indicate that you have re-quoted, and fill out both the bibliographic information of the primary and secondary literature in the reference list.

How to Write a Reference List

1. Information needed to write a reference list

Depending on the reference style and the type of material (such as books, articles), the rules of writing reference list are slightly different. However, most of the information required for reference list is similar.

 

  • Who: Who is responsible for this work? Author name
  • What: What is this work called? Title
  • When: When was this work published? Publication year
  • Where: Where can I retrieve this work? Publisher, Title of journal
  • Elements usually required when writing reference list

– Book: author name, title of book, publication year, publisher, place of publication, page numbers
– Journal article: author name, title of article, title of journal, publication year, volume, issue, page numbers

 

 

2. Reference style

There are several different styles of referencing: APA, MLA, Chicago, etc. Each style has its own rules for properly citing sources. All of the most common styles list every source used in a document at the end, in a reference list or bibliography. The styles differ in format. Each citation style has its own manual to help you figure out exactly how it all works. To find more information on specific citation styles and their corresponding style guide check out the table below.

Styles Developed by Research Area Reference example (Type: Book)
ACS American Chemical Society Chemistry, Engineering Morris, R. The Last Sorcerers: The Path from Alchemy to the Periodic Table; Joseph Henry Press: Washington, DC, 2003; pp 145-158.
IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineer(IEEE) Electrical and computer engineering [1] W. K. Chen, Linear Networks and Systems. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Press, 2003.
APA American Psychological Association Psychology, Business administration Alred, G. J., Brusaw, C. T., & Oliu, W. E. (2009). The business writer’s handbook. New York, NY: St Martin’s Press.
Chicago Chicago University History, Natural sciences Smith, Zadie. Swing Time. New York: Penguin Press, 2016.

※ Notes and Bibliography: Humanities, Author-Date: Natural sciences, Social sciences

 

 

3. Formatting author information

The method of writing the author’s name is slightly different for each type of reference style. English names are usually written in the order of ‘First name Last name’, and if you want to write the author’s last name in the front, write it in the order of ‘Last Name, First Name’.

Based on the example above, you can write as follows: ‘John F. Kennedy’, ‘Kennedy, John F.’, ‘Kennedy, F. J.’

 

 

4. Reference examples (ACS style)

 

  • Book
    – Format: Author 1; Author 2; Author 3;… Author 10; et al. Book Title, Edition Number; Series Information; Publisher: Place of Publication, Year; Volume Number, Pagination.
    – Example: Le Couteur, P.; Burreson, J. Napoleon’s Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History; Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam: New York, 2003; pp 32–47.

 

  • e-Book
    – Format: Author 1; Author 2; Author 3; …; et al. Book Title [Online]; Series Information (if any); Publisher: Place of Publication, Year; Volume Number, Pagination. URL (accessed Month Day, Year).
    – Example: Tour, J. M. Molecular Electronics: Commercial Insights, Chemistry, Devices, Architecture and Programming [Online]; World Scientific: River Edge, NJ, 2003; pp 177–180. http://legacy. netlibrary.com/ebook_info.asp?product_id=91422&piclist =19799,20141,20153 (accessed Nov 7, 2004).

 

  • Journal article
    – Format: Author 1; Author 2; Author 3; …; et al. Title of Article. Journal Abbreviation Year, Volume(Issue), Inclusive Pagination.
    – Example: Klingler, J. Influence of Pretreatment on Sodium Powder. Mater. 2005, 17, 2755–2768.

 

  • Thesis, Dissertation
    – Format: Author 1.Title of Thesis. Level of Thesis, Degree-Granting University, Location of University, Date of Completion.
    – Example: Mäckel, H. Capturing the Spectra of Silicon Solar Cells. Ph.D. Thesis, The Australian National University, December 2004.

 

  • Website
    – Format: Author. Title of Site. URL (accessed Month Day, Year), other identifying information.
    – Example: ACS Publications Division Home Page. http://pubs.acs.org (accessed Nov 7, 2004).

 

 

5. Useful items for reference styles

  • ACS style
    * The ACS style guide: effective communication of scientific information
    – Book: [3F] Book Collections QD8.5 A257 2006
    – e-Book: Quick Link
    * The ACS style guide(Chapter 14. References): Quick Link
    * ACS style : 주. 후주목록: [3F]Book Collections T11 김192 2006
    * Quick Cite(ACS style): Quick Link
    * ACS Quick Citation Style(by Condordia University Library): Quick Link
  • APA style
    * APA style : 주. 참고문헌: [3F]Book Collections T11 김192 2006
    * APA 논문작성법: [3F] Book Collections LB2369 P83 2013
    * AUT University Library ‘APA Referencing Style Guide’ (Web page: Quick Link)
  • IEEE style: IEEE ‘IEEE Citation Reference’ (Web page: Quick Link)
  • Chicago style
    * Chicago style : 주. 참고문헌: [3F] Book Collections T11 김192 2006
    * The Chicago manual of style: [3F] Book Collections Z253 C435 2017
    * Chicago Manual of Style Online ‘Notes and Bibliography’ (Web page: Quick Link)
    * A manual for writers of research papers, theses, and dissertations: Chicago Style for students and researchers: [3F]Book Collections LB2369 T87 2013
  • ★[Highly Recommended] Purdue Online Writing Lab
    You can check the cases and sample papers by reference style: APA, MLA, Chicago, IEEE, AMA, ASA
  • Quick Cite(by University of Auckland): Quick Link
    You can check the cases by reference style: APA, MLA, Chicago

How to make a reference list easy

1. Reference management Software: EndNote, Mendeley 

The library provides citation tools to help researchers to collect and organize references efficiently and generate bibliography automatically based on the various reference styles such as ACS, APA and IEEE style, etc.
2. Useful website: Citation Machine

Citation Machine is a free citation & bibliography generator. With Citation Machine, you can create citations in MLA, APA, Chicago/Turabian, and more.
3. MS Word

MS Word > References tab > Insert Citation > Go to References > Bibliography, and choose a format

References

  1. 학습윤리에 어긋나는 행위: 표절. http://www.cre.or.kr/board/?board=learning_articles&no=1385332 (accessed Aug 13, 2019).
  2. What is Common Knowledge?. https://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/citing-your-sources/what-common-knowledge (accessed Aug 5, 2019).
  3. How to Cite References: IEEE Documentation Style. https://ieee-dataport.org/sites/default/files/analysis/27/IEEE%20Citation%20Guidelines.pdf (accessed Aug 13, 2019).
  4. The Chicago Manual of Style Online. Notes and Bibliography: Sample Citations. https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide/citation-guide-1.html (accessed Aug 13, 2019).
  5. 김남석. ACS style : 주. 후주목록. 대구: 계명대학교 출판부, 2006.
  6. Coghill, A. M.; Garson, L. R. The ACS style guide: Effective Communication of Scientific Information [Online]; Washington, DC : American Chemical Society, 2006. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/bk-2006-STYG.ch014 (accessed Jul 30, 2019).

Library services A-Z

  • ★Renew & Reserve★
  • ★Recommend a purchase & DDS/ILB★
  • ★Off-campus access★
  • Visiting other libraries
  • Research guides
  • Library Kakaotalk service

Renew & Reserve

1. Renew the due date

  • How to: Library website> My account> Loans·Renewals·Holds·Overdue
    • Users can renew books that has been on loan if there is no reservation.
    • Each material may be renewed anytime until the maximum extension date: Undergraduates 45 days, Graduates 90 days
    • If you renew a book three days after from the loan date, your due date will be extended to three days.

▶ More details: Library website > Library Service > Loans·Renewals·More

 

 

2. Reservation

If a book in need is borrowed checked out, you can make a reservation to get first when it is returned. If you have an overdue item, you cannot reserve other items.

  • How to reserve: Search at the library website> Use the Reserve link which will appear at the bottom of the detail page of the item.
  • How to get it: Receive a e-mail or SMS when the book returned or ready. Visit 1F 『Smart Library』 to borrow the book. Your reservation will be cancelled if you don’t check out the book within 3 days.

▶ More details: Library website > Library Service > Loans·Renewals·More

Recommend a purchase & DDS/ILB

1. Recommend a purchase

You can recommend a purchase if there are materials you’d like to see added to the library’s collections. Depending on the library budget and whether the item is sold out or not, it may be difficult to purchase the requested item.

  • How long does it take: 2-3 weeks for Domestic books, 3-4 weeks for overseas books
  • How to get it: Receive a e-mail or SMS when the book returned or ready. Visit 1F 『Smart Library』 to borrow the book. Your reservation will be cancelled if you don’t check out the book within 3 days.

▶ More details: Library website > Library Service > Recommend a purchase

 

2. Document Delivery Service(DDS)

Delivers copies of journal article, book chapter scans, academic dissertations from other institutions that are not available in our library. It allows enrolled UNIST student, faculty and staff. Restriction on the use of DDS if you don’t get it at least 3 times or more per year.

  • How long does it take: 2-7 days for domestic materials, 2-14 days for overseas materials
  • How to request
    • Library website: Access and login > Library Service > Document Delivery Service > DDS Request
    • Find it @ UNIST (Google scholar, Scopus, etc.): Search the article > Select ‘Find it @ UNIST’ > Move to ‘Get it’ > Select ‘리소스 공유 요청’ > Check the information and request
    • Naver Academic: Sign in and search at Naver Academic> Select library links : 울산과학기술원 > Select ‘리소스 공유 요청’ > Check the information and request
    • RISS: Sign in and search at RISS > Select ‘복사/대출 신청’ > 01 문헌복사신청 > Check the information and choose providers (Please type your student/staff ID number when you register RISS)

▶ More details: Library website > Library Service > Document Delivery Service

  • How to get it: When the material is arrived, notification will be sent by the library. After receiving the notification please take your requested materials on the 3F Info Desk.

 

 

3. Inter library Borrowing(ILB)

Interlibrary Borrowing provides short term loans of books from other libraries that are not found in the library’s collection. It allows enrolled UNIST student, faculty and staff. Restriction on the use of DDS if you don’t get it at least 3 times or more per year.

 

  • How long does it take: 2-5 days
  • Use the books up to 3 weeks
  • How to request
    • Library website: Access and login > Library services > Interlibrary Borrowing > ILB Request
    • RISS: Sign in and search at RISS > Select ‘단행본’ > ‘복사/대출 신청’ > 02. 도서대출신청 > Check the information and choose providers (Please type your student/staff ID number when you register RISS)

▶ More details: Library website > Library Service > Inter Library Borrowing

Off-Campus Access

UNIST members can access the Library’s electronic resources (e.g. e-Books, journal papers and scholarly databases) remotely via several methods below. This service is offered only to currently enrolled students, faculty members, staff and researchers of UNIST. (Graduates, those on a leave of absence, or retirees are ineligible.)

 

  • How to use
    • Access via the the library website
      Log in to the the Library website > Check ‘OFF-CAMPUS ACCESS ON’ on the top-right of the website
      Go to E-Resources > Databases or E-Journals or E-Books and select a website link.
    • URL direct access or Use a bookmark
      To access a specific website directly, enter ‘https://openlink.unist.ac.kr/link.n2s?url=’ in front of the original address of the resource website.
      UNIST Portal account is needed.

▶ More details: Library website > E-Resources > Off-Campus Access

Visiting Other Libraries

UNIST members can use other academic libraries with ‘Access Request Form’. For other service, you should check the visiting the library policy. You should follow the policy when you visit other libraries. (The maximum period you may request is 30 days. If you want to extend access period, you should request again)

  • Under the accord, you can enter the libraries of Ulsan University and Ulsan college only with UNIST ID card.

▶ More details: Library website > Library Service > Visiting Other Libraries

Research Guides

Research Guides each of which is designed to help you find the most useful resources relevant to your department. It contains useful information and details of recommended resources to support your studies. If you don’t know what to use or where to search to find necessary information for your research, try this guide.

UNIST DadokDadok

UNIST DadokDadok is a service that introduces a recommended book every Monday morning. You can check the recommended books on the bulletin board of the UNIST portal, and if you want SMS service send your name and contact number to Kakaotalk(ID: unistlibrary) of the library.

Library Kakaotalk Service

If you have any questions or suggestions about the library services? Please contact us on Kakaotalk.

  • UNIST DadokDadok(ID: unistlibrary)
  • Service time: Mon-Fri, 9:00~17:00

Ask a Librarian